Adam's Task: Calling Animals by Name

Adam s Task Calling Animals by Name In it Vicki Hearne asserts that animals that interact with humans are intelligent than we assume In fact they are capable of developing an understanding of the good a moral code that influences thei

  • Title: Adam's Task: Calling Animals by Name
  • Author: Vicki Hearne Donald McCaig
  • ISBN: 9781602390027
  • Page: 238
  • Format: Paperback
  • In it Vicki Hearne asserts that animals that interact with humans are intelligent than we assume In fact, they are capable of developing an understanding of the good, a moral code that influences their motives and actions Hearne s thorough studies led her to adopt a new system of animal training that contradicts modern animal behavioral research, but as her examplIn it Vicki Hearne asserts that animals that interact with humans are intelligent than we assume In fact, they are capable of developing an understanding of the good, a moral code that influences their motives and actions Hearne s thorough studies led her to adopt a new system of animal training that contradicts modern animal behavioral research, but as her examples show is astonishingly effective Hearne s theories will make every trainer, animal psychologist, and animal lover stop, think, and question.

    • Unlimited [Crime Book] ↠ Adam's Task: Calling Animals by Name - by Vicki Hearne Donald McCaig ✓
      238 Vicki Hearne Donald McCaig
    • thumbnail Title: Unlimited [Crime Book] ↠ Adam's Task: Calling Animals by Name - by Vicki Hearne Donald McCaig ✓
      Posted by:Vicki Hearne Donald McCaig
      Published :2019-06-21T15:38:08+00:00

    One Reply to “Adam's Task: Calling Animals by Name”

    1. The only writer on animals I know of who combines (a) decades of experience training horses and dogs, with (b) a robust acquaintance with Wittgenstein. And she can write, too.

    2. Hearne was a marvelous poet, an amateur philosopher, and -- on the evidence of this book -- a superb animal trainer. It belongs on that short shelf of indispensable books about the nature of animals and the necessity for human straight talk and right thinking when working with them.

    3. I despised the writing in this book. I was tempted to stop many times when the inane, incomprehensible, philosophical babbling got too much but then there would be an actual animal training story that would catch my interest and I would labor on. Hearne had some interesting things to say but would always write it in the most academic and confusing way possible. She also constantly throws in random literary references in a way that made me feel like she was “showing off” rather than actually [...]

    4. This is one of my favorite books of all time. Hearne's observations on the importance of coherence to the sanity of animals (and humans!) rang immediately true to me, as did the complexity of navigating between the academic, intellectual world and the pragmatic world of those who work, day-to-day, with companion animals. Some feel the book is "too philosophical," but it's a philosophy book, and Hearne was a leading Wittgenstein scholar, as well as being one of the country's most accomplished tra [...]

    5. This is an excellent book. It is about loving animals, but NOT in a cute-widdle-wooda-wooda way. More in the sense of recognizing them as living beings. File under animal (and human) cognition, psychology, and philosophy; and maaaaybe animal training after that (but while it gives some excellent advice, this is in no way a how-to manual).In fact the only reason I didn't give this book 5 stars is that I have absolutely zero grounding in philosophy, and some of the academic discussion (Stanley Cav [...]

    6. Hearne intertwines her knowledge of horse and dog training with philosophical insights into the nature of our relationships with animals. Some of her literary/philosophical references were over my head, and her writing style was a bit convoluted at times, but overall I enjoyed her perspective on animal consciousness, language, and morality. Hearne is an intelligent and thoughtful writer, a poet and academic who argues that anthropomorphism isn't necessarily a bad thing, remaining respectful and [...]

    7. I became interested in the book when I came across a quote from her about whom dogs bite, an important question for me because our dog, who grew up feral, came to us without her bite response suppressed. Hearne was a trainer of working animals - horses and dogs - not pets, but animals with jobs. She was also a student of philosophy and linguistics and a poet. The book is about what light animal training can cast on philosophy and language and what they in turn may say about animal training. She [...]

    8. Her essay "What's Wrong with Animal Rights" is worth the price of the book. Unraveling and exploring the complex relationships we have with animals, Hearne starts with languaged all the assumptions behind the language we use when we talk about animals. Although I take issue with her METHODSis book changed my life as a trainer and as a thinker. What does it mean to trust? Must we mean what we say? What does it means to commit? It's dense,but highly readable and full of a unusual and compassionate [...]

    9. Vicki Hearne tells stories about "domesticated" animals, and why they are loyal to us. Horses, dogs and other creatures are fulfilling the contract they know they have with humans, They hold up their part of that agreement nobly and generously even in spite of the failings of humans whose lives they share. I've loved this book for years because it made me aware of the great hearts of the horses, dogs, cats, birds and cattle I've known. Animals have made me a better person.

    10. I enjoyed Hearne's anecdotes on training, although I think if you are a horse or a dog "person" you'll enjoy it more. I don't agree with all she says, (especially while reading this next to Cary Wolfe's Animal Rites) but she is a thoughtful writer, and her accounts of crazy horses and crazy dogs hit home for me.

    11. The writing is a little dense at times but the Hearne's ideas about animals were entirely worth the effort. I love animals, and realizing that they could be the subject of a philosopher's work was thrilling to me.

    12. I didn't realize this book would be so heavy on philosophy. I guess I should have known better. The author is a professor of philosophy. She also trains dogs and horses. I would have liked more about animal behavior and less heavy philosophy.

    13. Chapter 3 is one if the most interesting and deep chapters on the philosophy of language I have ever read. Fantastic. Packed full like an overflowing suitcase of implications about how both humans and dogs become the best versions of themselves.

    14. I read this book years ago and it still stays with me. Vicki Hearne was a very engaging author. She illustrates her points well with stories. This is a classic.

    15. Fascinating natural history that offers much insight into man's relationship with animals: wildlife, working animals and pets.

    16. This is a beautiful book about our responsibilities to the animals that we love and might come to love us. Highly reccomend it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *